Tuesday, November 10, 2015

Celebrating Native American Heritage Month With Your Kids

November is Native American Heritage Month and Leslie Stine is back to share with us some ideas on celebrating it with your kids.  


Native American Heritage Month

November is upon us, which means it is Native American Heritage month. You may be thinking it is important for your children to learn about different cultures. What better way than to learn about them yourself and teach your child? Now you may be thinking how do I teach something I don’t know a lot about? Easy! Everything is online now or something long lost... the library. Do some research yourself; find out what you would like to teach your child about the similarities and differences in cultures.

Native American month makes me think about strengthen, tradition, and family. Some things you can do to get your children learning about these things are, finding which states in the United States derive from Native American words. Another idea is to use “code talk” like the Navajos; your child can then create their own “code talk” you can use as a family to make fun messages. Native Americans language is still used today; a fun way to find out what words are still used is to create a glossary of them with your children. Allowing them to write this will also encourage handwriting skills and cognitive progression. Remember to, a great way to learn and spend time with your family is to get a book about Native Americans from your local library. This encourages reading skills, and reading comprehension.

Now that you have found a way to learn some of the basics of Native American Heritage, let’s talk about ways you can celebrate with your family. Cooking is fun for all ages, and food is always a great way to celebrate. Creating a Native American dish can be a fun and exciting learning experience. Try these: Cherokee fry bread, tin can pumpkin bread, grape dumplings, fried green tomatoes, and cornmeal pudding. Look for those recipes online!

There are other fun ways to create family memories and learn at the same time, one is learning through art. Art teaches children self-expression and a sense of self-reassurance of doing something they are proud of and enjoy. Here are some art ideas that allow your child to self-select materials; these are also good for ages two to adulthood. Create your own dream catcher, allow your child to choose which colors and beads they would like, then in the morning talk about what dreams were found in their dreamcatcher as well as yours. Remember you can used feathers, string, beads, and ribbon to make them.


Rain sticks are another great and inexpensive way to teach your child about Native American heritage. Use things like a toilet paper roll, markers, rice, beads, feathers, and whatever else your child would like to create these.


 Lastly, try something new called Wampum weaving, use pieces of fabric or just plain paper to create a weaving of your own, this will encourage your child to use their fine motor skills as well as their persistence.  


After doing all the activities you can, there is one thing you will know for sure. Nothing is more important than strength in your family. That is something Native American families will always teach us. As a mom you know how special time with your family is, and nothing is better than reliving a tradition you carry with you from your own heritage. Or here is my advice no matter how old your child is start a new tradition today!

 Feel like you are stuck and have nothing new to grow on? Here are some great ideas even for the smallest member of your family:

 Have a family “cook off” once a week. You have to make dinner anyways right? Why not make it fun for the whole family!

Have a family movie night. Place everyone’s name in a hat and pick on out that person gets to choose the movie. Find a fun movie themed snack to go along with it.

 Support each other in event. If you have older and younger children you know this one is big, take the younger ones with you.

Participate in a family event, run a 5k with the whole family. Check what local community events or drives are going on and go together.

We can learn so much from studying the Native American heritage, so join me this month in learning something new and keeping the traditions going. As well as making our own memories along the way.  

I am linking this post up to 




Works for Me Wednesday at Giving Up on Perfect


No comments:

Post a Comment